Who Signed The Belfast Agreement

The Good Friday Agreement, also known as the Belfast Agreement, was signed on Good Friday, 10 April 1998. It consists of two closely related agreements, the British-Irish Agreement and the Multiparty Agreement. It led to the establishment of a de decentralised system of government in Northern Ireland and the creation of many new institutions such as the Northern Ireland Assembly and Executive, the North-South Ministerial Council and the British-Irish Council. The participants in the agreement were two sovereign states (the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland) with armed and police forces involved in the unrest. Two political parties, Sinn Féin and the Progressive Unionist Party (PUP), were linked to paramilitary organisations: the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) and the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) respectively. The Ulster Democratic Party (UDP), which was linked to the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), had withdrawn from the talks three months earlier. On the front page of The Independent, the 1998 agreement provided for the creation of an independent commission to review police regulation in Northern Ireland, “including ways to promote broad community support” for these arrangements. The UK government has also committed to a “comprehensive review” of the criminal justice system in Northern Ireland. On 10 April 1998, the so-called Good Friday Agreement (or Belfast Agreement) was signed. This agreement helped to put an end to a period of conflict in the region known as unrest. These institutional arrangements, created in these three areas, are defined in the agreement as “interlocking and interdependent”. In particular, it notes that the functioning of the Northern Ireland Assembly and the North-South Council of Ministers is “so closely linked that the success of the other depends on the success of the other”, and that participation in the North-South Council of Ministers is “one of the essential tasks associated with the relevant posts in [Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland]”. .